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Tourism is a Major Driver of the New England Economy

Let's Reform the H-2B Program to Allow Seasonal Businesses to Thrive

 
 

"The Cape’s seasonal economy presents unique challenges to its business community, and without the H-2B program, many of these businesses could not staff their operations sufficiently to deal with our yearly influx of visitors from over the bridge."

Congressman Bill Keating (D-MA-9)

New England hosts more than 60 million visitors per year.  Seasonal tourism is a major driver of the New England economy, fueled by thousands of restaurants, hotels, resorts, and other small businesses that rely on an influx of additional workers to meet customer demand during their peak seasons. The ability to hire through the H-2B Temporary Non-Agricultural Worker visa program - in the absence of a sustained local workforce - has enabled these small businesses to thrive, contributing to the health of the regional economy.  

The New England Seasonal Business Coalition (NESBC) is a collection of local small businesses and economic development organizations that advocates for improvements and protections to the H-2B visa program. The program’s inefficiencies and restrictions have adversely affected the operations of small businesses across the region for many years, and now is the time for change. NESBC was established to focus on three main objectives to ensure small businesses can rely on the H-2B program to continue operations during peak seasons, year after year. 

THE NEW ENGLAND SEASONAL BUSINESS COALITION IS ADVOCATING FOR REFORMS TO THE H-2B PROGRAM THAT WILL PROTECT SEASONAL BUSINESSES ACROSS THE REGION.

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OBJECTIVE 1

Ease the annual H-2B visa cap.

OBJECTIVE 2

Streamline the current Department of Labor process.

OBJECTIVE 3

Pursue fundamental programmatic reforms to the H-2B visa program.

NESBC and its members will engage key decison makers in Washington and back home on the economic benefits of the H-2B program, and the dire consequences that businesses, supply chains, and communities are already confronting. Read More →

FOUNDING MEMBERS

COALITION MEMBERS

 

QUICK FACTS

 

CASE STUDY

The Lobster Pot is a seafood restaurant located on the tip of Cape Cod in Provincetown, MA.

As a resort community, Provincetown’s seasonal economy typically runs between 8-10 months, depending on the nature of the business. The Lobster Pot typically opens in early April and closes late November, serves on the average 185,000 guests during a typical season, employs on average 100 employees (50% Americans, 50% H-2B Jamaicans), and is one of the largest employers in the Provincetown area. 

 


see the impact a delayed opening had on one New England business (click each point to expand): 

+ Loss of Sales Revenue

The Lobster Pot opened for its 2016 season one month later than normal resulting in the loss of sales revenue of approximately $450,000.

+ Increased Unemployment Pay

Unemployment benefits paid by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to the Lobster Pot’s approximately 40-50 unemployed Americans for the additional one month amounted to $57,000.

+ Tax Loss to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Meals tax loss to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the additional one month amounts to approximately $31,600 with approximately $3,600 that would have returned to local government.

+ Decrease of Purchases from Vendors

Vendor purchases from suppliers for one month’s business.

+ Loss of Goodwill

The loss of goodwill from customers cannot be calculated.

WHAT OUR COALITION MEMBERS HAVE TO SAY

 
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Without supplemental help from H-2B workers, we would be forced to close our doors and put a significant amount of Americans out of work.
— Lobster Pot
 
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Bottom line is very few successful restaurants, hotels, etc will be able to function, to carry on business, without foreign workers.
— Arnold’s Lobster & Clam Bar